CARMENES

Teegardens Star
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Project website: https://carmenes.caha.es

All publications:

https://carmenes.caha.es/ext/science/index.html#anchor:refereed

Astronomer responsible for the instrument: José A. Caballero

CARMENES
The nearest single star to the Sun hosts an exoplanet at least 3.2 times as massive as Earth — a so-called super-Earth. Data from a worldwide array of telescopes, including ESO’s planet-hunting HARPS instrument, have revealed this frozen, dimly lit world. The newly discovered planet is the second-closest known exoplanet to the Earth and orbits the fastest moving star in the night sky. This image shows an artist’s impression of the planet’s surface. Credit: ESO/M. Kornmesser

CARMENES (Calar Alto high-Resolution search for M dwarfs with Exoearths with Near-infrared and optical Échelle Spectrographs) is an innovative instrument designed to search for Earth-like planets. It is installed at the 3.5-metre telescope of the Calar Alto Observatory in Almería, jointly operated by the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) and the Junta de Andalucía.

CARMENES consists of two high-resolution spectrographs, one for visible and one for infrared, optimised for the detection of planets around nearby stars of spectral type M, the most frequent in the Galaxy, but also the coolest and faintest. It is a unique instrument in the world, both in terms of precision and stability and in the use of telescope time. It works in vacuum conditions and with temperatures controlled down to the thousandth of a degree.

More than 200 scientists and engineers have been involved in the CARMENES project consortium, mainly from the 11 different Spanish and German institutions that have participated in the design, development, integration and scientific exploitation of the instrument. Specifically, the Spanish institutions that are part of the consortium are: Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (IAA), Institut de Ciènces de l’Espai (ICE), Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), the Centro Astronómico Hispano-Alemán (CAHA) and the Centro de Astrobiología (CAB, CSIC-INTA), while the German institutions are: Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie (MPIA), Landessternwarte Königstuhl (LSW), Institut für Astrophysik Göttingen (IAG), Thüringer Landessternwarte Tautenburg (TLS) and Hamburger Sternwarte (HS).

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The CARMENES search for exoplanets around M dwarfs A super-Earth planet orbiting HD 79211 (GJ 338 B)
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The CARMENES search for exoplanets around M dwarfs Characterization of the nearby ultra-compact multiplanetary system YZ Ceti
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The CARMENES search for exoplanets around M dwarfs: Dynamical characterization of the multiple planet system GJ 1148 and prospects of habitable exomoons around GJ 1148 b
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Stellar atmospheric parameters of FGK-type stars from high-resolution optical and near-infrared CARMENES spectra
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The CARMENES search for exoplanets around M dwarfs: Measuring precise radial velocities in the near infrared: The example of the super-Earth CD Cet b
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The CARMENES search for exoplanets around M dwarfs: Radial velocities and activity indicators from cross-correlation functions with weighted binary masks
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The CARMENES search for exoplanets around M dwarfs: The HeI infrared triplet lines in PHOENIX models of M 2-3 V stars
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The CARMENES search for exoplanets around M dwarfs: Variability of the HeI line at 10 830 angstrom
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